Mechatronics Canada

January 4, 2021

Maxon’s new IDX compact integrated servo gearmotor + drive combines a powerful, brushless EC-i motor and an EPOS4 positioning controller, which can be complemented with a maxon planetary gearhead when required.  This integrated motor stands out for its high torque density, high efficiency, maintenance-free components, and a high-quality industrial housing providing IP65 protection. The IDX also features configurable digital and analog inputs and outputs, and intuitive software enabling easy commissioning and integration into master systems.

The IDX integrated servo motor yields extremely high continuous torques and high-power density.  Its compact size makes the IDX more efficient than current solutions on the market. The unit's high-quality design is complemented with an IP65-protected housing.

Maxon IDX integrated servo motors are suitable for use across the entire speed range (from standstill to maximum speed) and have an extremely high overload capability. Together with its internal positioning controller and integrated single turn absolute encoder, absolute positioning is standard.

The IDX motors have a large functional scope for systems with an operating voltage from 12 to 48 VDC.  As such they are extremely flexible for use in industrial, robotics, AGV (Automated Guided Vehicles) and logistics applications with the most stringent of requirements, such as autonomous transport systems.

Information on Maxon’s new IDX compact integrated servo gearmotor + drive can be viewed at: https://idx.maxongroup.com/idx/index#Start

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