Mechatronics Canada

MC-11-AsBsOfIOLink-400.jpg

October 7, 2021

By Colin Cartwright, System Sales Manager, MURR CANADA

Now we’re all back from our summer breaks, it’s time to get back to work and continue our Connectivity Corner series. Last time out, we looked at the similarities IO-Link has with USB in “Why IO-Link is Like an Industrial Version of USB”.

Over the next couple of months, we’re going to dig deeper into some of the technical aspects of IO-Link so you can have a better understanding of the data types, communication speeds, maximum transmission distance, and the different power classes of IO-Link.

Let’s start with the connection pin-outs you’ll typically find on an IO-Link device. With most IO-Link devices coming with M12 connectors, we’ll use the pin-out configuration of an M12 connector for our examples. The most basic version of IO-Link only requires three connections to be made: Pin 1 = 24VDC, Pin 2 = 0V, and Pin 4 = IO-Link Communication. Yes, pins 1,3, and 4 are the same pins you would usually use to connect regular sensors. Uniformity is one of the nice things about the IO-Link standard. An IO-Link device requiring only these three connections is categorized as a Class A device.

IOL-Port_Class_A.jpg

Some IO-Link devices (usually output devices like valve manifolds) need additional power so for these devices you will also need to connect Pin 2 to 24VDC and Pin 5 to 0V. You can either use the same power supply or a different power supply for these connections. If your IO-Link device requires all five pins to be connected, then it is categorized as a Class B device.

IOL-Port_Class_B.jpg

So other than an extra two wires to connect, what’s the real difference between Class A and Class B?

Well, it basically comes down to the amount of current available on pin 1. The IO-Link standard (IEC 61131-9) specifies that the maximum current for Class A devices should be 200mA. That’s plenty of power for input devices like proximity sensors or cylinder reed switches, but it's a little low to drive a hydraulic solenoid or a valve bank with 16 valves. The Class B standard was therefore introduced to provide extra power for these types of IO-Link devices. There is no current limit specified for Class B devices in the IO-Link standard, but as the individual pins of M12 connectors are limited to 2A, the maximum amount of current that can be supplied to a Class B IO-Link device is typically 2A.

One major benefit of IO-Link Class B connectivity is the potential to connect output devices to safety systems. Using a special T-Coupler will enable you to connect the actuator power separately to the IO-Link power. For example, pins 2 and 5 can be connected to a safety relay or safety controller which will enable you to shut down the actuator power without affecting the communication to the device.

Here is an example showing a Murrelektronik Cube67 IO-Link Module controlling a Festo valve bank with an IO-Link interface using one of our IO-Link T-Couplers to separate the actuator power.

IOL-Class-B-Safety.jpg

In this example, an M12 IO-Link port on the IO-Link module provides basic power and IO-Link communication to the valve bank via pins 1,3 and 4 on the left side of the T-Coupler, while the power for the valve solenoids is supplied separately from a safety relay or safety I/O module connected to pins 2 and 5 on the right side of the T-coupler. When the safety outputs feeding the switched actuator supply are turned off there will be no power to pin 2 on the valve bank connector to energize the valve solenoids so they cannot move, however, IO-Link communication is still enabled.

With many pneumatic manufacturers now offering IO-Link interfaces for their valve banks, I think this is now the most economical and effective way to connect valve banks. It reduces your electrical connection to a single 5-pole M12 cable and enables you to locate a valve bank anywhere there is an I/O module with IO-Link Class B ports, rather than running a cable back to your panel or adding an additional IP address.

That’s it for this month. Next month we’ll be digging deeper into the technical side of IO-Link data types and communication speeds. Have a great month!

Latest Articles

  • Prev
Endress+Hauser has invested roughly 46 million euros in the expansion of its Maulburg, Germany ...
Littelfuse, Inc.,, an industrial technology manufacturing company empowering a sustainable, ...
Today, small and large manufacturing plants in North America are ramping up production, and many ...
GAM announces the release of the new GCL cycloidal gearboxes. The new gearboxes provide high ...
Now we’re all back from our summer breaks, it’s time to get back to work and continue our ...
Recently, Electromate Inc. was proud to announce that it has been named on the 2021 list of ...
Before a new assembly cell for shock absorbers was due to go into operation at a well-known car ...
Algoma Steel Inc. recently announced it is contributing $100,000 to Sault College to support the ...
Actuators are systems that convert energy into torque to move components in various equipment. Even ...
The Covid-19 pandemic has made it abundantly clear that to overcome the challenges of rising ...

Products

  • Prev
Regardless of whether the set-up operation must be monitored safely, protection via speed ...
Roboze has equipped its flagship 3D printer – the ARGO 500 – with an advanced B&R automation ...
Electromate Inc., a major Canadian Distributor of Precision Robotic & Mechatronic Solutions, ...
When it’s time to specify a rotary motor for a space-constrained assembly, size and weight will ...
AutomationDirect has added new ProSense CLC series conductive liquid level controllers to their ...
IKO International has introduced the CR…BSE Series of imperial cam followers, offering machine ...
The decentralized FIEPOS field power supplies with high protection classes IP54, ...
Milling, countersinking or micro-cutting ─ the intelligent iTENDO toolholder has already proven its ...
Universal Robots (UR) is changing the face of manufacturing with its collaborative robot arms, or ...
POSITAL KIT encoders offer you smart, maintenance-free and cost-efficient solutions for the most ...

Featured Product: FLIR A50 and A70 Thermal Cameras Offer Turnkey Solutions for Efficient Data Analysis


MC-6-Flir-A50A70Hero-400.jpg

When decision makers seek to integrate new hardware into their automation process, they are often looking at a few key areas – the ease of use, price point, features, and the ability to utilize the hardware at multiple points throughout their system. The new A50 and A70 thermal cameras come in three options – Smart, Streaming, and Research & Development to fit the needs of professionals across a variety of industries – from manufacturing to utilities to science.  The new cameras offer improved accuracy of ±2 °C or ±2% temperature measurement, compared to the previous accuracy of ±5 °C, or ±5% temperature measurement. The cameras all include an IP66 rating, along with a small, compact size with higher resolution options compared to previous versions.

Featuring a thermal resolution of 464 x 348 (A50) or 640 x 480 (A70), professionals can deploy the A50 or A70 cameras in a variety of capacities. These include condition monitoring programs to maximize uptime and minimize cost through planned maintenance, or when used in early fire detection applications to safeguard the lives of workers and secure the profitability of the business by protecting materials and assets. With improved temperature measurement accuracy of ±2 °C, professionals can rely on consistent readings over a period of time, or through varying environmental factors, eliminating any guesswork from data analysis.

The IP66 rating for both the A50 and A70 provides protection from dust, oil, and water, making the cameras ideal for tough, industrial environments. This ruggedness is especially helpful when the camera is being moved from one application to the next. Whether the camera is fix-mounted inspecting a production line or when required for bench testing, professionals benefit from its versatility.

A50/70 Smart

Designed for condition monitoring programs to reduce inspection times, improve production efficiency, and increase product reliability, the A50 and A70 Smart cameras introduce “on camera / on edge” smart functionality.

Read More


 

Mechatronics Canada

Mechatronics Canada‘s editorial informs and engages a targeted audience of manufacturers, distributors, specifiers and end users delivering an editorial mix of the right content for the right audience.

Subscribe Here

Kerrwil Publications

538 Elizabeth Street, Midland,Ontario, Canada L4R2A3 +1 705 527 7666
©2021 All rights reserved

Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Privacy Policy (effective 1.1.2016)
The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Kerrwil